Thursday, October 27, 2016

Lectures & Art Talks: Panel Discussion “Kingston: Filming The City” on Thursday, October 27, 2016 @ 2:00pm; show EXTENDED through Saturday, November 5, 2016 at NGJ — Jamaica, West Indies

“Kingston: Filming The City” on October 27, 2016 at NGJ
Lectures & Art Talks: Panel Discussion “Kingston: Filming The City” on Thursday, October 27, 2016 @ 2:00pm; show runs through Sunday, October 30, 2016 at NGJ — Jamaica, WI; Event Details – Where: National Gallery of Jamaica; Location: 12 Ocean Blvd, Block C, Kingston, Jamaica (Entrance is on Orange Street); Tel: 1-876-922-1561, 1-876-922-1563; Fax: 1-876-922-8544; E-mail: info@natgalja.org.jm; Opening hours: Tues-Thurs: 10am to 4:30pm; Fri: 10am-4pm; Sat: 10am-3pm; Last Sundays: the NGJ is open every last Sunday of the month, 11am-4pm
About the Panel Discussion: “On Thursday, October 27, 2016, starting at 2:00 pm, the National Gallery of Jamaica will be hosting a panel discussion entitled 'Kingston: Filming the City.' This event aims to explore the the work of filmmakers in depicting and interpreting Kingston life and its environs. 'Kingston: Filming the City' is part of the educational programming associated with the NGJ’s current feature exhibition 'Kingston, Part 1: The City and Art,' which opened on July 31 and will now close on November 5. The exhibition utilizes paintings, sculpture, ceramics, film and photography to explore the dynamic between Kingston’s growth as a major commercial as well as cultural centre and the development of Jamaican visual art practice and infrastructure. The focus on film for the panel discussion was inspired by the inclusion of two motion-picture works in the exhibition: Chaotic Beauty (2016), a video by emerging Jamaican digital artist Di-Andre Caprice Davis, and The Harder They Come (1972), the iconic Jamaican film directed by Perry Henzell and written by himself and Trevor Rhone. Both of these productions have featured Kingston not just as a backdrop to story-telling, but as a key location element that informs narrative progression and character development. Some have argued that The Harder They Come is also a portrait of Kingston and a time-capsule representation of urban life in Jamaica in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Kingston has featured in several other memorable, locally produced and international films, including the first James Bond film Dr No (1962), Rockers (1978), Dancehall Queen (1997), Third World Cop (1999), Better Mus’ Come (2010) and Kingston Paradise (2013). Kingston also serves as the locale and backdrop to numerous Jamaican and other music videos, such as Proteje’s Kingston Be Wise (2013). The discussion on October 27 will be moderated by lecturer of Audio-Visual History at the University of the West Indies (Mona), Dr. Julian Cresser, along with many distinguished panellists. 'Kingston – Part 1: The City and Art' is curated by National Gallery Assistant Curator Monique Barnett-Davidson and continues until Saturday, November 5, 2016 ...”Read more: National Gallery of Jamaica
About the Exhibition: “The National Gallery of Jamaica cordially invites you to the 'Kingston – Part 1: The City and Art' exhibition which opened on Sunday, July 31, 2016 and continues through Saturday, November 5, 2016 . 'Kingston – Part 1: The City and Art' is the first installment of a two-part exhibition series that explores the role of Kingston in the development of Jamaican art and, conversely, the actual and potential role of art in the development of the city of Kingston. Inspired by Kingston’s recent UNESCO designation as a Creative City of Music, the exhibition makes the case that Kingston has been the crucible for many other aspects of Jamaican culture, such as the visual arts. Featuring works of art from the late 17th century to the present as well as documentary photographs, the exhibition looks at how Jamaica’s turbulent but culturally fertile capital city has generated circumstances and opportunities that have propelled the development of Jamaican art, from the natural resources to the economic activities and institutions. The exhibition also explores how artists have been inspired in their work by the events, personalities and tales that have defined life in the city, starting with the 1692 Port Royal earthquake. 'Kingston – Part 1: The City and Art' is curated by National Gallery Assistant Curator Monique Barnett-Davidson and continues until Saturday, November 5, 2016 ...”Read more: National Gallery of Jamaica
For further information: National Gallery of Jamaica Blog, National Gallery of Jamaica.org and National Gallery of Jamaica-Twitter

No comments:

Post a Comment