Friday, December 12, 2014

Exhibition: Jamaica Biennial 2014 at Devon House - "2014 JAMAICA BIENNIAL" at NGJ: Opening Reception on Sunday, December 14, 2014 — Jamaica, West Indies

James Cooper – "Communicating with Nature" (Jamaica Biennial 2014 at Devon House)
http://nationalgalleryofjamaica.wordpress.com/
Exhibition: Jamaica Biennial 2014 at Devon House - "2014 JAMAICA BIENNIAL" at NGJ: Opening Reception on Sunday, December 14, 2014 — Jamaica, West Indies; Event Details – Where: Devon House; Location: Hope Rd, Kingston, Jamaica; Telephone: 1-876-926-0815 and Where: National Gallery of Jamaica; Location: 12 Ocean Blvd, Block C, Kingston, Jamaica (Entrance is on Orange Street); Telephone: 1-876-922-1561, 1-876-618-0654; Fax: 1-876-922-8544; E-mail: info@natgalja.org.jm; Opening hours: Tues-Thurs: 10am to 4:30pm; Fri: 10am-4pm; Sat: 10am-3pm; Last Sundays: the NGJ is open every last Sunday of the month, 11am-4pm
Jamaica Biennial 2014 at Devon House: “One of the most exciting new developments in the Jamaica Biennial 2014 is the collaboration with Devon House, which is hosting Biennial projects by six artists, five from Jamaica and one from Bermuda: Greg Bailey, James Cooper (Bermuda), Laura Facey, Ebony G. Patterson, Oneika Russell, and Cosmo Whyte. Having some of the Biennial exhibits outside of the National Gallery of Jamaica itself helps to give the Biennial greater visibility and encourages greater engagement from a variety of audiences – in addition to Devon House, part of the biennial (the Renee Cox exhibition) is also shown at National Gallery West at the Montego Bay Cultural Centre and one project, by Blue Curry, can be seen on the streets of Downtown Kingston. The collaboration with Devon House is the first of what we hope will be an ongoing programme of shared projects and comes at particularly opportune time. The National Gallery first opened its doors at Devon House on November 14, 1974, forty years ago, and operated there until mid-1982, when the institution was relocated to its present building on the Kingston Waterfront. Showing part of the Jamaica Biennial 2014 at Devon House thus amounts to a home-coming on the occasion of our 40th anniversary. The six artists selected for the Devon House exhibition of the Jamaica Biennial 2014 were selected f because the thematic content and formal qualities of their work have relevance to the context of the House and we opted to make interventions into the space of the House that would make visitors think in new ways about its history and significance. The young painter Greg Bailey is represented with a large formal portrait painting of a black man in a tailored suit seated in an ornate chair, provocatively titled Boasy Slave. It takes the place of the portrait of the 18th century Governor Peter Beckford, in the dining room. This substitution comments ironically on the social and racial dynamics of colonial and postcolonial Jamaica and also makes reference to the history of Devon House itself, as the first plantation style Great House to be built and owned by a black Jamaican – Jamaica’s first black millionaire, George Stiebel – to the distress of the 19th century white elite. Lady Musgrave Road, the story goes, was constructed because Governor Musgrave’s wife did not wish to see Mr Stiebel and family on their verandas when she drove out to go to town.”Read more: http://nationalgalleryofjamaica.wordpress.com/
For further information about NGJ: http://nationalgalleryofjamaica.wordpress.com/.   For further information about Devon House: http://www.devonhousejamaica.com/

Devon House Tour Jamaica - video by CARNIVAL LIVE TV

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